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Slidin’ Thru: Anders

It seems like nowadays, all the talented artists are burgeoning out of Toronto. Insert Anders, a 23-year-old R&B crooner who simply creates music that appeals to the masses, drawing inspirations from every direction possible. Whether it’s bringing you back into a time and place or creating brand new memories, the “Bad Guy” singer creates music full of emotion, feeding off whatever vibe he’s feeling at the time. Read more…

With the release of his debut EP 669, Anders organically gained a major buzz both online and in his hometown, making it almost baffling to think he only started making music barely two years ago. Unbothered by what the next man is doing, he records off personal life experiences, only sharing parts of him he’s willing to let the world see.

Of course, with the success comes attention, something the reserved private and reserved Anders is still struggling to get used to.

For those who don’t know, who is Anders?
Anders is next. That’s it. [laughs]

Where do you fit in the realm of R&B and hip-hop?
I kind of just do my own thing. I don’t pay attention to what’s around me. The music that I make, I try to do something different every time. I don’t really have music that sounds like a sound or any two songs that are similar, so I guess it’s hard to describe. For me, it’s whatever I’m feeling, just try to be inspired by everything.

Being from the 6, how does that play into your life and career?
Everything. [laughs] It’s everything I know. Definitely everything that I go through is from there. All the people I know, etc.

How important is it to come to LA as an up and coming artist?
There is just so much more shit here. You realize when you come out here that where you’re from just feels small, so you gotta come out here.

What is your favorite part of the city?
I just like being out here, the amount of people out here. There is just so much of everything.

At what point did you realize this music thing was forreal?
Probably getting ready to do my first show and actually doing it. ‘Cause it was my first time performing ever, it was in May. Well, I guess I did one little rehearsal run with family and friends, but that was different.

Of this year?
Yeah, you missed it. May 22nd in Toronto. You’ve never been to Toronto ever?

I need to!
Just go when it’s warm.

How does your fanbase compare here compared to Toronto?
LA is so much more dense, in terms of being here. I guess in Toronto, you get recognized here and there, but the fans here… they cool. [laughs]

When you come out here do you record with certain artists or producers?
Yeah, I mainly link up with Bizness Boi and J. Valle. He’s a producer, super dope. I’m having a brain fart, zero sleep.

“You For You” is one of my favorite records. Talk about what goes behind your visuals.
The video was done by Karena Evans. She’s super sick. She did hella sick videos after, but the video is cool. It’s weird because I’m still getting used to shooting videos.

What were you doing before this?
I was just out here, just hustling. I was trying to go to school but every time, I would go for three weeks or a month. And that’s barely going, going and then sleeping. It’s just like you’re not really going to school. I would drop out, and try again. Go back to school, and drop out.

What do your parents think? Mine would be trippin’.
My mom, she’s at a point where she’s just like, “he’s going to do whatever he wants to do.”

Are you an only child?
Nah, I have 2 sisters.

Right now, you’re making more records for the ladies. Do you plan on revealing more of your story?
Yeah, maybe if it comes out. It just kind of depends what mood I’m in. To me, that’s just been something I never really talk about. I’m just used to being very private about it. I’m not saying I don’t wanna talk about it right now, but music wise.

Did you just pick up music and you were good at it?
I guess I just always had a thing for music growing up. Music was my thing. I know for some people, it might be cartoons or something, but music was what got me going.

You unleashed your Twos EP earlier this year. Talk about the creative process and how long it took you.
At the time, I took a pretty long break after putting out 669. I kind of just was quiet, doing my thing.

On purpose?
No, not on purpose. Just life. I started in November of last year, that’s when I was like, “it’s time to crack down.” I wanted do the next one. November, December, January, February, March, that was the time frame I worked on it, but the majority of it was done at the end. [laughs]

Why you laughing?
‘Cause when I think about it, it’s just funny how it comes out. The first few months of it, you were working but sometimes, you have those slumps where you just don’t wanna work or whatever. It was at the end that it came together. I’m like a fourth quarter kind of guy.

On “Bad Guy,” you say: “I might start poppin’ pills again, anything to feel again.” How has music been a form of therapy for you?
I guess it’s a way to express yourself. It’s a form of expressing yourself. On a daily basis, I am pretty introverted. Like I can go a day without talking to anyone. [laughs] It wouldn’t bother me at all. I’m not weird with people, but I definitely enjoy being alone too.

Do you write all your own music?
Yeah.

You talked about how you kicked it into gear at the end. Did something in your life spark that?
I have the worst memory ever, I can’t really remember. For example, “Bad Guy,” I did that in one day. I just went to a session with S.L.M.N., which is a producer I work with often. Then we ended up talking, not even cooking. I remember that night I went home and at the time, Luca was crashing at my place. Luca is a producer that I work with very frequently. We get back to my spot and he just plugs in his computer. like anywhere.

He starts playing that loop thing, “doo do do do,” and then he just did this beat in probably 20 minutes, like short. At this point, it was late. It was like 3 or 4 am, we were tired. But you know when you’re tired, and you just keeping going? I’m just like chilling there, smoking, and he’s just cooking this beat. He’s like, “You wanna try something on it?” I’m like “yeah sure.” The way I record, I just sit there, and I got a mic just like this. [shows mic] That’s how I record. So he goes to sleep on the couch and I’m recording in my headphones. It probably took me like 40 minutes, of just trying shit on it.

I turned the volume on to play it and at this point, he was asleep. I remember looking at him, he sleeps like a mummy. [chuckles] It’s so weird, I don’t know how people sleep like that. I turn the volume on and my verse started coming in, and he just woke up. [laughs] He was like, “Yo, run that back!” So that was quick. Around that time too was when I just started finishing a lot of the music. You get like a rush.

Do you write your lyrics down?
I don’t have one process. Some of them, I’ve tried to write on my phone. Sometimes, I have a line on my phone, and I just go off of that. For the most part, I’m writing as I am recording, trying to just figure it out.

Do you feel it’s hard as a minority in an urban-dominated industry? Any obstacles?
I don’t think I’ve had any obstacles that have had to do with race. Fuck, probably the main shit that’s in my way would be more my past, more than anything.

Like legal stuff?
Yeah, everything to do with that.

What is it you want fans to get from your music?
I’m not calculated in that way. For me, making music is just about feeling something in the moment. That is your way of expressing it. Some people might go to someone to talk, but I just make music. People can listen to it if they like it. Also when I look back on music too, it kind of helps because I have a bad memory. It’s like you’re taking a picture. You’re talking about shit, so you kind of remember it forever.

I just interviewed an artist that said each album is a chapter of their life.
Yeah ‘cause what I’m working on right now might be whatever I am going through right now. Then by the time it comes out, I am already going through something else. It’s always interesting to compare it.

Talk about diving into EDM & experimenting in that realm.
EDM, that game is crazy. It’s just so next level.

Addy: That’s where the money is.

EDM is crazy ‘cause you don’t have to play your own music. When you go to EDM festivals and you look at the crowds, they react differently than with other kinds of music. That game is crazy.

Is there any DJs you wanna work with?
I haven’t really thought that far.

On “Press It Up,” you say “fell in love with money, I just needed a taste.” What did you do with your first bag?
I don’t even remember to be honest. ‘Cause I started hustling when I was 15. Fuck, I don’t know what I did with it. What did kids used to do with it? They just buy shit. [laughs] You’re only 15 years old.

Do you have the same homies? What do they think of the music?
Yeah, I still know all the same people. I guess they think it’s cool. They are cool about it.

How important is social media for your career?
I mean, it’s important. It’s a big platform to do things so I think it’s important in anyone’s career. At least in what I do.

What would you be doing if you weren’t doing music?
Just getting to the bag.

What do you like to do for fun?
Anything. Everyone has their own little things. Sometimes I watch Anime, sometimes I watch basketball.

3 things you need in the studio?
Privacy, water, and good vibes.

Favorite song to perform in a set?
Can’t think, I don’t know. For me, I don’t really have favorites of anything.

I feel like you’re just chillin’.
Yeah, I’m super chillin’. If you asked me what is my favorite food, I wouldn’t know. I like so much food. I don’t wanna pick one and betray the other ones that I like.

Do you have dreams of selling out arenas? What are your long term goals?
Oh yeah. Obviously, it’s to be the fucking biggest thing ever I can be. I feel like that should be everyone’s goal. If you’re gonna make music, you want people to hear your music. Unless you just want to make it for yourself. I’m always thinking about how to grow as an artist, and my following, but I focus a lot on just making better music too.

What’s the best encounter you had with a fan?
I just remember a lot of moments. There was one time when I went to a Japanese restaurant in Toronto. The guy that brought out my food, he was short and had glasses. He came out and explained whatever’s in it, turns around, and then turns back around. He’s like, “Excuse me by the way, are you Anders?” I was like, “Yeah, what’s up?” He was like, “I just wanted to say, I really like your music.”

Awwww.
I was on a date too, I took a girl there. I’m like “aw I appreciate that,” and he walked away. At the time, my show was coming up in a month. I was basically like, “I got you for the show.” It was one of those cute moments. He seemed young. I just like making people’s days like that. I just like when people are cool. I don’t like when people are weird.

Who’s the most played artist on your phone?
I don’t even have my phone on me. Right now in terms of hip-hop, I listen to a lot of Atlanta shit. Like Gunna obviously, I fuck with Lil Baby. Thugger is one of my favorite artists ever. In terms of R&B, I don’t really listen to new R&B, like the shit that comes out. ‘Cause I’m just so focused on doing what I do, I try not to listen to too much other shit.

A lot of the times when I cook, I’ll listen to… I have phases. There could be a time where I’m just listening to French music, just to refresh my ear. There was a time when I listened to Bossa Nova for a month straight, and I’m talking about all the time. I’ll be with somebody and I’m playing it, they’re like “what the fuck is this?” “Yo, it’s Bossa Nova!” I try to listen to everything just to see. Obviously, someone who made it has a vision for it. I’m trying to see what their vision, not just like “oh I cant listen to this ‘cause I don’t like it.”

I feel bad, my whole life I’ve been saying I don’t like country.
Yo, country is like rap music. If you listen to the shit they say, like bitches, trucks, etc. They just do it in a different way.

Dream collab?
Young Thug and Lil Wayne. Those are my top two.

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